Archive for August, 2010

Prepping sun-kissed skin for the colder months

August 31, 2010

As holiday season draws to a close and with the autumnal climate arriving sooner than expected, people are being advised by a leading skin specialist to act now on sun-kissed skin ahead of the colder months.

Leading skin specialist, Peter Beard from SkinGenesis is advising people to prepare the skin now before the draining effects of autumn and winter cause lasting damage on the face, hands and neck.

Starting a regular skin protection programme well in advance of when the harsher elements kick in can pay dividends to a person’s complexion by developing a protective barrier to safeguard skin integrity.

Peter, who is director of treatments at the leading skin care specialist, says that taking time to introduce your skin to a new regime post-summer can rectify any sun damage early and prevent all the irritations and problems associated with such a dramatic change in seasons.

He said: “If you have spent two or three weeks in the sun, even returning to the present cooler weather can play havoc with the skin in terms of oil production or dry skin. By starting a dedicated skin regime now, you can build up your skin’s natural resistance to the harsher elements to maintain a healthy glow and avoid problems later down the line.

“The skin is the body’s largest organ, yet it is the most neglected throughout the year. The colder months are already setting in and judging by previous British winters, it is a good idea to start prepping the skin for what is likely to be one with a particularly vengeful bite.”

Peter has provided his top tips to instantly brighten the face and start prepping for the colder months:

Invest in a quality facial cleanser

There is no doubt that a good quality cleanser can bring dramatic benefits to the skin. Achieving a balance is key and with so many products available, it is important to find one that contains ingredients that are suitable to your skin type and pH. Many are very drying on the skin, so it’s worth shopping around and requesting samples from cosmetics counters so that you can try a product before you buy it.

Double up with a rich moisturiser

Many people who suffer from traumatic skin problems such as acne believe that moisturising the skin only causes the skin to be more oily, which is not necessarily true. Choosing an oil-free, rich moisturiser can actually work with the cleanser to balance the skin and restore lost moisture, which in turn will prevent problematic, excess oil production. The pH of a moisturiser should be no greater than 5.5 and should be rich in antioxidants and vitamins. A low pH ensures that the barrier function of the skin will be at its optimum and the vitamins and antioxidants will help the skin repair any accumulated sun damage.

Refresh and revive with a gentle skin peel

The skin exfoliates naturally on a regular basis, but the build up of cells, along with make-up traces and the daily grime, can cause pores to become blocked. Modern non-surgical cosmetic treatments, such as gentle chemical peels and microdermabrasion can give the skin a boost by freeing it of dead cells more quickly, leaving you with a refreshed, more polished complexion.

Eat a healthy diet

Diet is often overlooked but its effect on the skin is dramatic. Your skin is as good as the nutrients you feed it. The dos and don’ts of a healthy skin are simple. Don’t eat simple carbohydrates and transfats and do eat a diet rich in minerals, vitamins, proteins and essential fatty acids. As a guide eat a wide variety of vibrantly coloured fresh vegetables, fruits and salads together with oily fish such as sardines, mackerel and salmon and avoid processed foods, white bread and sugary sweets.

Choose ‘healthy’ make-up

Make up is not what it used to be – it has evolved with the development of ‘healthy’ cosmetics ranges that actually protect the skin, as well as enhancing your appearance. It’s important, particularly with sensitive skin, to use a make up range that cares for your skin and does not deplete it of its natural nutrients. Mineral make up brands are always best, many of which have been developed with problems like acne, thread veins and oiliness in mind.

Choose the right, natural colours for your skin

Simple changes to your usual make-up colour palette can make all the difference to your appearance. To look younger and more fresh-faced, swap black shades for navy blue or dark brown, which tend to be softer and make the eyes look whiter and brighter. Semi-permanent make-up can also ensure make-up stays put and can achieve a natural look for eyebrows that have thinned with age. Certain blush shades suit certain skin tones better than others too, so play around with the testers in store to ensure yours lifts your skin, rather than clashing with your tone or hair colour.

SkinGenesis is a non-surgical cosmetic expert with clinics in Leeds, Manchester and Chester.

For more information visit the SkinGenesis website www.skingenesis.co.uk

Perfect female body – New Poll!

August 25, 2010

SkinGenesis Poll:

Young people warned by BBC on dangers of tanning beds

August 24, 2010

A documentary aimed at young people called ‘Revealed’ on BBC Two at the weekend highlighted the dangers of sunbeds on young skin.

GPs say they are witnessing record levels of some of the most dangerous forms of skin cancer in young people.

Whether it is a sunbed you are using, or simply sunbathing in the natural sun light, too much UV radiation exposure can result in some nasty melanomas.

‘Revealed… Loving the Tan’ featured a case study  called Amy, 24 from Sheffield, who developed skin cancer on her arm, and it was only by a chance mention to a GP about a suspicious mole that triggered her diagnosis.

SkinGenesis cannot stress enough the importance of being sensible in the sun. All summer we have been running our ‘Safety in the Sun’ campaign, providing advice on how to have fun in the sun, while protecting yourself from the dangers.

Our sun protection advice would be to simply not use sunbeds. Natural exposure to the sun is fine, as long as it is not abused and adequate sun protection precautions are taken, such as wearing sun cream, wearing a hat and avoiding the sun at peak times.

Watch Amy’s story on Revealed here.

Jaw bone changes contribute to ageing

August 11, 2010

Natural changes to the jaw bone and other facial bones contribute to an ageing appearance, which could impede on your anti-ageing regime.

At least that’s what researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center say.

They believe that it takes more than the tightening of loose skin to take years off the face due to natural changes to facial bones – particularly the jaw angle.

We don’t believe that the bones change shape significantly enough to stop your skin rejuvenation regime in its tracks. It is no secret that the skin loses its elasticity over time and that its ability to produce collagen slows down as we get older.

However you can re-train the skin into thinking it is youthful again. By putting it through natural cosmetic, but non-invasive procedures like microdermabrasion and SkinGym, you can ‘trick’ your skin into behaving in a manner that it did 10 years ago.

The result? More radiant, vibrant, tighter skin that people will definitely notice (and compliment you on)!

For more information, visit: www.skingenesis.co.uk

Before and after skin rejuvenation anti-ageing treatment at SkinGenesis

All-over tan is impossible to achieve – Sun protection advice

August 6, 2010

A perfect all-over tan is impossible to achieve, according to new research. The scientists suggest that instead of having one skin type, everyone has different skin regions meaning that some regions tan more easily than others.

Tests using UV light to tan volunteers found a significant difference between how a persons back tans and how their bottom tans. Their backs tanned a lot more easily, and this can explain why many people find it difficult to develop an all over tan.

It has also been shown than the top of the back is easier to tan than the legs, and that the outer arms will tan more easily than the inner arms. Therefore, what is burning for one region of skin may not be for another, which makes advice on how to long to spend in the sun more difficult to follow.

The study was carried out in order to investigate why the number of melanoma tumours varies depending on body site, and the research suggests it may be due to the different ways that areas of the skin react to the sun.

We offer a great sun protection guide to help you manage your sun exposure and protect your skin, because even areas of skin that are more difficult to tan are susceptible to burning.